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විරෝධතා පා ගමනට ජල ප්‍රහාරයක්

(ඉන්දිකා රාමනායක )

බොදුබල සේනා සංවිධානයේ මහලේකම්  ගලබොඩඅත්තේ ඥානසාර හිමියන් නිදහස් කරන්නැයි  ඉල්ලමින් සංවිධාන  කිහිපයක් එකතු වී පැවැත්වු විරෝධතා පාගමනකට  ගාලු පාර ජනාධිපති  ලේකම් කාර්යාලය අසළදී ජල ප්‍රහාර එල්ලකරමින්  විසුරුවාහැරීමට පොලීසිය කටයුතු කළේය.

http://www.lankadeepa.lk/latest_news/%E0%B7%80%E0%B7%92%E0%B6%BB%E0%B7%9D%E0%B6%B0%E0%B6%AD%E0%B7%8F-%E0%B6%B4%E0%B7%8F-%E0%B6%9C%E0%B6%B8%E0%B6%B1%E0%B6%A7-%E0%B6%A2%E0%B6%BD-%E0%B6%B4%E0%B7%8A%E2%80%8D%E0%B6%BB%E0%B7%84%E0%B7%8F%E0%B6%BB%E0%B6%BA%E0%B6%9A%E0%B7%8A/1-540633

 

Protest by monks teargassed

The Police fired teargas at a protest by some Buddhist monks near the presidential secretariat calling for the release of Ven. Galagodaatte Gnanasara Thera a short while ago.  They also used water cannons to disperse the protesting monks.

http://www.dailymirror.lk/article/Protest-by-monks-teargassed-158586.html

 

Sri Lanka MPs hurl 'chilli powder' and chairs in fresh chaosLegislators allied to disputed PM Rajapaksa fight with rivals in second day of clashes

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Legislators allied to disputed PM Rajapaksa fight with rivals in second day of clashes


 

 

 

 

 

A clash between rival members of the Sri Lankan parliament, in Colombo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sri Lanka’s parliament has been disrupted for a second day, with legislators allied to the disputed prime minister, Mahinda Rajapaksa, hurling chairs at police officers and allegedly throwing chilli powder at opposing MPs.

It was the latest violent incident in the crisis that erupted three weeks ago, when the president, Maithripala Sirisena, suddenly announced he had sacked the prime minister Ranil Wickremesinghe and installed Rajapaksa in his place.

Despite the violence, the pro-Rajapaksa MPs failed to prevent the assembly from passing a no-confidence motion in his leadership, dismissing his government for the second time this week.

Unlike the previous vote, however, Friday’s motion omitted any reference to misconduct on the part of Sirisena. The change indicates the president could recognise the motion this time and agree to terminate Rajapaksa’s leadership.

Rajapaksa’s forces have already said they will reject Friday’s vote. “We say Mahinda Rajapaksa heads the government,” said Dinesh Gunawardena, a Rajapaksa ally. “We shall agitate for elections. The country is in anarchy. The parliament is in anarchy.”

Security was heavy in parliament on Friday after the previous day’s session had to be abandoned when MPs scuffled inside the chamber, requiring one to be hospitalised. One MP, Palitha Thewarapperuma of the United National party, was seen wielding a knife in Thursday’s fray.

Before the session could start, MPs allied to Rajapaksa surrounded the Speaker’s ceremonial chair, shouting protests at the use of knives in Thursday’s brawl.

More than two dozen police officers entered the chamber with their arms linked, trying to escort the Speaker, Karu Jayasuriya, inside along with parliamentary officials in white coats carrying a ceremonial mace.

Advised not to enter the chamber by his security staff, Jayasuriya, 78, responded: “I will enter the chamber for the future generations of Sri Lanka”, a witness to the scene told the Guardian.

As Rajapaksa watched from his chair, his MPs attacked the officers with chairs and books, injuring up to 11. Other legislators tipped the Speaker’s ceremonial chair to the floor and dragged it across the ground.

Taking refuge on a side bench and surrounded by officers, Jayasuriya called for a voice vote on the no-confidence motion in Rajapaksa. A roar erupted across the chamber and the Speaker declared the vote carried by a majority.

Jayasuriya must now formally communicate the result to Sirisena, which he is expected to do later on Friday.

Outside the chamber, MPs Gamini Jayawickrama Perera and Vijitha Herath could be seen rubbing their eyes, with splotches of chilli splattered across their robes.

“They have behaved as beasts, not as human beings,” Herath told reporters outside the chamber.

He wore a large bandage across his forehead, saying he was injured when an opposing lawmaker lobbed a copy of the Sri Lankan constitution at his head.

If recognised by Sirisena, who ultimately commands the country’s armed forces and police, Friday’s no-confidence motion would leave the country without a prime minister.

According to the constitution, Sirisena will need to name a prime minister who he believes can command a majority of parliament’s vote. Wickremesinghe would have the numbers, but the acrimony between he and Sirisena – one of the key factors in sparking the crisis – makes it doubtful he would be chosen.

Also uncertain is how Rajapaksa and his supporters will respond to the result. He tweeted after the vote: “The Speaker’s ad-hoc decisions are the main reason for today’s situation in parliament. The need is to go for a election and lead the way to a stable parliament.”

Wickremesinghe told a press conference on Friday evening it was “a black chapter in our history”.

“I’ve been there when a bomb was thrown … but this is the deliberate breaking up of parliament by a group of people claiming to be the government,” he said.

“Today Sri Lankans have again seen deplorable behaviour by some MPs, unbecoming of them and of their noble institution,” the British High Commissioner to Sri Lanka, James Dauris, wrote on Twitter. “No parliament can perform its role when its own members stop it from doing so.”

 

 

 

 

More than two dozen police officers entered the chamber with their arms linked, trying to escort the Speaker, Karu Jayasuriya, inside along with parliamentary officials in white coats carrying a ceremonial mace.
Advised not to enter the chamber by his security staff, Jayasuriya, 78, responded: “I will enter the chamber for the future generations of Sri Lanka”, a witness to the scene told the Guardian.
As Rajapaksa watched from his chair, his MPs attacked the officers with chairs and books, injuring up to 11. Other legislators tipped the Speaker’s ceremonial chair to the floor and dragged it across the ground.
Taking refuge on a side bench and surrounded by officers, Jayasuriya called for a voice vote on the no-confidence motion in Rajapaksa. A roar erupted across the chamber and the Speaker declared the vote carried by a majority.
Jayasuriya must now formally communicate the result to Sirisena, which he is expected to do later on Friday.

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/nov/16/sri-lankan-mps-chilli-powder-chairs-clashes-parliament

   

Sri Lanka MPs pass no-confidence vote against new prime minister

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Lawmakers show their support for Sri Lanka's ousted prime minister Ranil Wickremesinghe during a parliamentary session in Colombo on November 14, 2018.

Colombo, Sri Lanka (CNN)Sri Lankan lawmakers have passed a no-confidence motion against the country's new Prime Minister, Mahinda Rajapaksa, declaring his appointment "void and invalid" amid raucous scenes in the country's Parliament.

Supporters of Rajapaksa refused to recognize the vote as legitimate, plunging the country deeper into crisis, as fears grow that the political dispute could spill into wider instability.
The move follows the shock decision last month by President Maithripala Sirisena to sack Ranil Wickremesinghe as prime minister, and replace him with controversial former strongman President Mahinda Rajapaksa. The announcement triggered protests and violence leaving one person dead.
Wickremesinghe denounced Sirisena's attempt to remove him from office and refused to leave the official prime minister's residence, claiming the president does not have the power to take such action.
Sirisena had attempted to prevent a vote of no-confidence by dissolving Parliament until December 7, however, on Tuesday, the Supreme Court overturned the president's controversial decision and ordered an interim order, paving the way for fresh elections.
In a move that showed that he was potentially softening his hard stance, Sirisena invited his ousted Prime Minister, Ranil Wickremesinghe, leaders of his party and those associated for talks Wednesday evening.
Spokesman Mahinda Samarasinghe declined to comment on the meeting, but told CNN: "The President will act constitutionally and within the framework of the law of the country."
Sri Lanka's former president and newly appointed prime minister Mahinda Rajapakse (C) attends the parliament session in Colombo on November 14, 2018.

Passed by voice, not by name

The passing of the no-confidence motion comes as a major blow to Sirisena, demonstrating that his appointment of Rajapaksa does not have the majority backing of the 225 seat Parliament.
Contrary to the usual practice, notice of the motion was given Wednesday morning and taken up for discussion immediately after.
However, such was the commotion inside the House Wednesday, Speaker Karu Jayasuriya was prevented from taking the vote by name, as is standard, and instead forced to take a vote by voice.
The resolution, which was passed by a majority, was moved by left wing Janatha Vimukthi Peramuna (JVP) party leader Anura Kumara Dissanayaka and law maker Vijitha Herath.
The United National Party of ousted Prime Minister Wickremesinghe, the Tamil National Alliance and smaller Muslim parties all supported the no-confidence motion.
Three newly sworn cabinet ministers and a state minister also crossed over to the opposition benches in support. Both Rajapaksa, as well as his ousted predecessor Wickremesinghe were present during the vote.
Sri Lanka's ousted prime minister Ranil Wickremesinghe (L) looks on during Wednesday's  parliamentary session, November 14, 2018.

Instability in Colombo

Violence erupted in the capital at the end of October when crowds loyal to the President attempted to prevent the recently deposed petroleum minister Arjuna Ranatunga from entering a government building in Colombo.
As crowds surged around Ranatunga, a former Sri Lankan cricket captain, the official's bodyguards opened fire, killing one person and injuring three others.
Ranatunga subsequently claimed that his bodyguards opened fire because the crowd was "trying to kill" him.
One bodyguard was nevertheless taken into custody and an investigation is underway, police spokesperson Ruwan Gunasekera confirmed.
https://edition.cnn.com/2018/11/14/asia/sri-lanka-no-confidence-intl/index.html
 

Pandemonium in Sri Lankan parliament as MPs hurl books at speaker

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Mahinda Rajapaksa supporters throw books, chilli paste and water bottles at speaker to disrupt second confidence vote.

Sri Lanka's parliament descended into chaos for a second day on Friday as legislators supporting newly appointed Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa threw books, chilli paste and water bottles at the speaker to try to disrupt a second no-confidence motion.

The vote went ahead anyway and for a second time, legislators turned against Rajapaksa and his new government, possibly opening the way for the return of Ranil Wickremesinghe as prime minister.

Wickremesinghe was removed by President Maithripala Sirisena late last month and replaced with Rajapaksa, plunging the country into a constitutional crisis.
WATCH: Chaos in Sri Lanka parliament as MPs exchange blows (1:53)

"We have the majority," Wickremesinghe told reporters. "We can form our government and we will act accordingly."
Sirisena is now faced with the choice of either reappointing the man he kicked out only a few weeks ago or allowing the crisis to continue with potentially damaging consequences for the economy.

Rajapaksa supporters poured on to the floor of parliament, surrounding the Speaker's chair, and demanded the arrest of two MPs from Wickremesinghe's party for allegedly bringing knives into the house on Thursday.

An MP from Rajapaksa's Sri Lanka Podujana Peremuna party sat in Speaker Karu Jayasuriya's seat surrounded by more than 20 legislators, delaying the start of proceedings. Rajapaksa loyalists then tried to prevent Jayasuriya from sitting on a second chair brought in by police.

When Jayasuriya started calling out names to know whom MPs supported, Rajapaksa supporters threw the books and chilli paste at him.

Parliament on Wednesday passed the first no-confidence motion against Rajapaksa and his government with the backing of 122 of 225 MPs in a voice vote, followed by a signed document. Sirisena did not accept that result and called for the second vote.

Sirisena dissolved parliament last week and ordered elections to break the deadlock. But the Supreme Court ordered a suspension of that decree on Tuesday until it had heard petitions challenging the move as unconstitutional.

Sources close to the leadership have said Sirisena's decision to sack Wickremesinghe came after the prime minister's party rejected the president's request to back him for a second five-year term in the 2020 presidential elections.

They had also split over whether to back Chinese or Indian investors in various projects, the sources said.

India and Western countries have requested Sirisena act in line with the constitution while raising concerns over Rajapaksa's close ties with China.

Beijing loaned Sri Lanka billions of dollars for infrastructure projects during Rajapaksa's presidency between 2005 and 2015.

Tourism accounts for nearly five percent of the economy and is a key main foreign exchange earner, along with the garment and tea industries and remittances from Sri Lankans working abroad.
Sri Lanka's parliament descended into chaos for a second time on Friday [Reuters]

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/11/pandemonium-sri-lanka-parliament-mps-hurl-books-speaker-181116121100915.html

   

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